Women Heroes Of World War I PDF Free Download

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Marine Sergeant Dan Daly entered World War I as one of the United States’ most famous Marines, having already won the Medal of Honor on two separate occasions for his service during the Boxer. At the time of the First World War, most women were barred from voting or serving in military combat roles. Many saw the war as an opportunity to not only serve their countries but to gain more rights and independence. With millions of men away from home, women filled manufacturing and agricultural positions on the home front. Others provided support on the front lines as nurses, doctors. World War II: Witness to War tells the stories of the brave men and women who sacrificed everything in order to survive the war. Told through first-hand accounts, we revisit major battles and momentous events of the war that changed the world forever. Free eBooks Project Gutenberg.

I am afraid that the terrible Coronavirus emergency and consequent Government guidance means that we must advise participants to cancel or postpone the majority of the VE Day 75 community celebrations due to take place on the bank holiday weekend of 8th – 10th May. It is right and proper that people should be kept safe and healthy.

My sincere thanks to the many thousands who registered their involvement and events and were looking forward to celebrating VE Day 75 is the ways planned. I know how disappointed you will be that these cannot go ahead as planned. However we are sill encouraging solo buglers/trumpeters/cornet players to play the Last Post at 2.55pm from the safety of their homes, along with the Pipers undertaking Battle’s O’er and VE 75 years at 3pm local time in the country they are in, as well as Town Criers, Crying out for Peace at 6.55pm in a similar way too on the 8th May 2020.

While the Pipers are playing Battle’s O’er, and the recorded speech by Prime Minister Churchill is being broadcast by the BBC into our homes at 3pm on the 8th May, we would still like to encourage the people of our great country and abroad to stand at 3pm within the safety of their living rooms, front or back gardens, outside their front doors or balconies if they have one, and undertake the Nation’s Toast to the Heroes of WW II, using the following words. “TO THOSE WHO GAVE SO MUCH, WE THANK YOU,” using this unique opportunity to pay tribute to the many millions at home and abroad that gave so much to ensure we can all enjoy the freedom we share today.

We are delighted to confirm that Dame Joan Collins accepted my invitation to join in on the Toast, and will be leading the ‘Nation’s Toast’ on behalf of the women of the nation from the balcony of her apartment in London at 3pm on the 8th May 2020.

Dame Joan said: “We must never forget the selflessness of all those who sacrificed so much to keep us free during WW II. This is why I immediately joined up to support the Nation’s Toast. This meaningful gesture recognises the importance of not only the brave veterans who fought on the front lines but also the courageous women who put their lives in the line for this nation’s struggle.”

However, you could take part in celebrations safely from home by joining your BBC Local Radio station initiative in making your own VE Day Great British Bunting. Download everything you need at bbc.co.uk/makeadifference

The Royal British Legion is calling on people across the UK to join in a moment of reflection and Remembrance at 11am on Friday 8th May, the 75th Anniversary of VE Day, and pause for a Two Minute Silence. I hope that we will all support this aspect of VE Day from the safety of our homes too.

Bruno Peek LVO OBE OPR
Pageantmaster VE Day 75

VE DAY 75 CANCELLATION ADVICE

I am afraid that the terrible Coronavirus emergency and consequent Government guidance means that we must advise participants to cancel or postpone the majority of the VE Day 75 community celebrations due to take place on the bank holiday weekend of 8th – 10th May. It is right and proper that people should be kept safe and healthy.

My sincere thanks to the many thousands who registered their involvement and events and were looking forward to celebrating VE Day 75 is the ways planned. I know how disappointed you will be that these cannot go ahead as planned. However we are sill encouraging solo buglers/trumpeters/cornet players to play the Last Post at 2.55pm from the safety of their homes, along with the Pipers undertaking Battle’s O’er and VE 75 years at 3pm local time in the country they are in, as well as Town Criers, Crying out for Peace at 6.55pm in a similar way too on the 8th May 2020.

While the Pipers are playing Battle’s O’er, and the recorded speech by Prime Minister Churchill is being broadcast by the BBC into our homes at 3pm on the 8th May, we would still like to encourage the people of our great country and abroad to stand at 3pm within the safety of their living rooms, front or back gardens, outside their front doors or balconies if they have one, and undertake the Nation’s Toast to the Heroes of WW II, using the following words. “TO THOSE WHO GAVE SO MUCH, WE THANK YOU,” using this unique opportunity to pay tribute to the many millions at home and abroad that gave so much to ensure we can all enjoy the freedom we share today.

We are delighted to confirm that Dame Joan Collins accepted my invitation to join in on the Toast, and will be leading the ‘Nation’s Toast’ on behalf of the women of the nation from the balcony of her apartment in London at 3pm on the 8th May 2020.

Dame Joan said: “We must never forget the selflessness of all those who sacrificed so much to keep us free during WW II. This is why I immediately joined up to support the Nation’s Toast. This meaningful gesture recognises the importance of not only the brave veterans who fought on the front lines but also the courageous women who put their lives in the line for this nation’s struggle.”

However, you could take part in celebrations safely from home by joining your BBC Local Radio station initiative in making your own VE Day Great British Bunting. Download everything you need at bbc.co.uk/makeadifference

The Royal British Legion is calling on people across the UK to join in a moment of reflection and Remembrance at 11am on Friday 8th May, the 75th Anniversary of VE Day, and pause for a Two Minute Silence. I hope that we will all support this aspect of VE Day from the safety of our homes too.

Bruno Peek LVO OBE OPR
Pageantmaster VE Day 75
VE Day 75th AnniversaryVE Day 75th Anniversary

VE DAY 75 CANCELLATION ADVICE

I am afraid that the terrible Coronavirus emergency and consequent Government guidance means that we must advise participants to cancel or postpone the majority of the VE Day 75 community celebrations due to take place on the bank holiday weekend of 8th – 10th May. It is right and proper that people should be kept safe and healthy.

My sincere thanks to the many thousands who registered their involvement and events and were looking forward to celebrating VE Day 75 is the ways planned. I know how disappointed you will be that these cannot go ahead as planned. However we are sill encouraging solo buglers/trumpeters/cornet players to play the Last Post at 2.55pm from the safety of their homes, along with the Pipers undertaking Battle’s O’er and VE 75 years at 3pm local time in the country they are in, as well as Town Criers, Crying out for Peace at 6.55pm in a similar way too on the 8th May 2020.

While the Pipers are playing Battle’s O’er, and the recorded speech by Prime Minister Churchill is being broadcast by the BBC into our homes at 3pm on the 8th May, we would still like to encourage the people of our great country and abroad to stand at 3pm within the safety of their living rooms, front or back gardens, outside their front doors or balconies if they have one, and undertake the Nation’s Toast to the Heroes of WW II, using the following words. “TO THOSE WHO GAVE SO MUCH, WE THANK YOU,” using this unique opportunity to pay tribute to the many millions at home and abroad that gave so much to ensure we can all enjoy the freedom we share today.

We are delighted to confirm that Dame Joan Collins accepted my invitation to join in on the Toast, and will be leading the ‘Nation’s Toast’ on behalf of the women of the nation from the balcony of her apartment in London at 3pm on the 8th May 2020.

Dame Joan said: “We must never forget the selflessness of all those who sacrificed so much to keep us free during WW II. This is why I immediately joined up to support the Nation’s Toast. This meaningful gesture recognises the importance of not only the brave veterans who fought on the front lines but also the courageous women who put their lives in the line for this nation’s struggle.”

World War I Causes

However, you could take part in celebrations safely from home by joining your BBC Local Radio station initiative in making your own VE Day Great British Bunting. Download everything you need at bbc.co.uk/makeadifference

The Royal British Legion is calling on people across the UK to join in a moment of reflection and Remembrance at 11am on Friday 8th May, the 75th Anniversary of VE Day, and pause for a Two Minute Silence. I hope that we will all support this aspect of VE Day from the safety of our homes too.

Bruno Peek LVO OBE OPR
Pageantmaster VE Day 75

You are welcome to download any of these documents to help in the organisation of your events and activities for VE Day 75.

The Certificate of Participation was designed by students from Cliff Park Ormiston Academy, Gorleston-on-Sea, Norfolk.

Click on the link to begin the process.

VE Day 75 LogoTerms of Use

Please note the logo can be used free of charge if you are organising an event as part of VE Day 75. However, if your company wishes to use the VE Day 75 Logo for use on product packaging or marketing collateral for commercial activity purposes; a license fee will apply.

For official license approval – please call Bruno Peek at 07737 262 913 or email at [email protected]

  • VE Day 75 Logo
  • The Nation’s Toast to the Heroes of World War 2
  • A Cry for Peace Around the World
  • British Beer & Pub Association Pub Toolkit
  • VE 75 Years Music – VE 75 Years Music (plain white background) – VE 75 Years Music (BWW)
  • Tribute to the Millions
  • Certificate of Grateful Recognition (General)
  • Certificate of Grateful Recognition (Round Table & 41 Club)
  • Certificate of Grateful Recognition (Rotary Great Britain & Ireland)
  • Certificate of Grateful Recognition (Merchant Navy Association)
  • Bruno Peek LVO OBE OPR – Pageantmaster VE Day 75
  • Poem by Peter Wyton: Unmentioned in Despatches

A Nations Toast Resources

'Jive like it’s 1945 with Dance for VE Day'

This May, English Heritage is getting England swing dancing to celebrate the 75th anniversary of VE Day. Over the bank holiday weekend we’ll be sending out our dance experts to help individuals and local groups across the 48 counties of England, to learn how to Lindy Hop in true 1940s fashion. They’ll then take to town squares, city streets and village halls to showcase their new skills at community celebrations.

Anyone can apply to be part of Dance for VE Day, whether you’re having a knees up in a Nissen hut or a party in the park, and we’re especially interested to hear from you if you’re planning to get the whole community involved in your celebrations, regardless of age, ability, background or belief.

Women

All you need to do is to fill in the application form on the English heritage website: https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/VE-Day by 5pm on March 8th 2020.

After the closing date, we’ll choose one application from each county in England – and we’ll do everything we can to get you dancing in time VE Day 75.

Photographer: Andrew AB Photography
Photograph provided by Mersey Swing CIC
Dancers (left to right): Liam Craddock, Normandie Wragg, Hannah Anderson, Cat Foley, Felix von Aulock, Helen Maguire, Pippa Dawson, John Daglish, Jane Critchley, Susan Whittle.

Website: English Heritage: VE Day 75


English Heritage Party Pack

Join the Celebration! with English Heritage.

English-Heritage-Party-Pack.pdf

To download: Right Click 'Save link as:'


Six Million Women (The Homefront Song)

Our friends Mumbo-Jumbo, close harmony singer-songwriters from Worcester, have written this special song for the Toast to the Heroes. ‘Six Million Women (The Homefront Song)’ celebrates the vital role of the Homefront in bringing peace to the nation. The song features the wonderful vocals of folk singer Edwina Hayes.
We are inviting people holding VE Day 75 events across the country to feature the song, either playing the Mumbo-Jumbo/Edwina Hayes version or performing it themselves from the instrumental or manuscript versions. Please download the song from the links below.

Website: Mumbo Jumbo


Six Million Women (The Homefront Song)

Performed by Mumbo-Jumbo featuring Edwina Hayes.

This song has been specially written by Mumbo-Jumbo for the VE Day 75 Celebrations’ Toast to the Heroes. The song celebrates the vital role of the Homefront in bringing peace to the nation. Please include its performance as part of your event. For more information on the song and performers.

Six-Million-Women-The-Homefront-Song.mp3

To download: Right Click 'Save link as:'

https://www.veday75.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/Six-Million-Women-The-Homefront-Song.mp3

Six Million Women (The Homefront Song) – Instrumental version

If you would like to perform ‘Six Million Women (The Homefront Song) at your VE Day 75 event, this instrumental version has been recorded so you can download and sing along with it as a backing track at your events. The lyrics can be downloaded with the music from the link below.

Six-Million-Women-Instro-Mix.mp3

To download: Right Click 'Save link as:'

Jul 08, 2009 New Release: Major speed improvements We've released quite a few features in the past couple months, so we decided to spend the last couple weeks completely focused on improving the speed and function of the editor. New release: major speed improvements inc. Nov 25, 2018 New version of pqR, with major speed improvements 2018-11-25 at 5:45 pm 5 comments I’ve released pqR-2018-11-18, a new version of my variant implementation of R. You can install it on Linux, Windows, or Mac as described at pqR-project.org. Installation must currently be from source, similarly to source installs of R Core versions of R. Nov 17, 2020 Following version 86's release on Android, Mac, Windows, and Linux, the next release of Google's browser is rolling out. Chrome 87 rolling out with significant speed improvements, more battery.

http://www.veday75.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/Six-Million-Women-Instro-Mix.mp3

Six Million Women (The Homefront Song) – Music and Lyrics

If you are planning to perform ‘Six Million Women (The Homefront Song)’ at your event here are the music and lyrics.

Women Heroes of World War I PDF Free downloadSix-Million-Women-Music-and-Lyrics.pdf

To download: Right Click 'Save link as:'


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Born
Jannetje Johanna Schaft

16 September 1920
Died17 April 1945 (aged 24)
Bloemendaal, Netherlands
NationalityDutch
Other namesThe girl with the red hair
Known forResistance fighter during World War II
Monument to Hannie Schaft in the Kenaupark, Haarlem

Jannetje Johanna (Jo) Schaft (16 September 1920 – 17 April 1945) was a Dutch resistance fighter during World War II. She became known as 'the girl with the red hair' (Dutch: Het meisje met het rode haar). Her secret name in the resistance movement was 'Hannie'.

Early life and education[edit]

Hannie Schaft was born in Haarlem, the capital of the province of North Holland.[1] Her mother, Aafje Talea Schaft (born Vrijer) was a Mennonite and her father, Pieter Schaft was attached to the Social Democratic Workers' Party; the two were very protective of Schaft because of the death due to diphtheria of her older sister Anna in 1927.[1]

Women Heroes Of World War I Pdf free. download full

From a young age, Schaft discussed politics and social justice with her family, which encouraged her to pursue law and become a human rights lawyer.[1] During her law studies at the Universiteit van Amsterdam, which she started in 1938, she became friends with the Jewish students Sonja Frenk and Philine Polak . This made her feel strongly about actions against Jews. With the German occupation of the Netherlands in World War II, in 1943, university students were required to sign a declaration of allegiance to the occupation authorities. When Schaft refused to sign the petition in support of the occupation forces, like 80% of the other students, she could not continue her studies and in the summer of 1943 she moved in with her parents again, taking Frenk and Polak with her who went into hiding.[2]

Resistance work[edit]

Pistol of Hannie Schaft, FN M1922

Schaft's resistance work started with small acts. First, she would steal ID cards for Jewish residents (including her friends).[1] Upon leaving university, she joined the Raad van Verzet [nl] or 'Council of Resistance', a resistance movement that had close ties to the Communist Party of the Netherlands.[2] Rather than act as a courier, Schaft wanted to work with weapons. She was responsible for sabotaging and assassinating various targets.[2] She carried out attacks on Germans, Dutch Nazis, collaborators and traitors. She learned to speak German fluently and became involved with German soldiers.

Schaft did not, however, accept every assignment. When asked to kidnap the children of a Nazi official she refused. If the plan had failed, the children would have to be killed, and Schaft felt that was too similar to the Nazis' acts of terror.[3] When seen at the location of a particular assassination, Schaft was identified as 'the girl with the red hair'. Her involvement led 'the girl with the red hair' to be placed on the Nazis' most-wanted list.[2]

On 21 June 1944 Schaft and Jan Bonekamp, a friend in the resistance, carried out an assassination in Zaandam on Dutch police officer and collaborator Willem Ragut. Schaft fired first and hit Ragut in the back. Bonekamp was shot in the stomach by Ragut before killing him. Mortally wounded Bonekamp fled the scene but was arrested shortly afterwards and taken to hospital. There he inadvertently gave Schaft's name and address to Dutch Nazi nurses feigning to be Resistance workers. To force Schaft to confess, German authorities arrested her parents and sent them to the Vught concentration camp.[4] The distress of this situation and her grief over Bonekamp's death forced Schaft to cease resistance work temporarily. Her parents were released after two months.[4]

Upon recovery, Schaft dyed her hair black and wore glasses to hide her identity and returned to Resistance work. She once again contributed to assassinations and sabotage, as well as courier work, and the transportation of illegal weapons and the dissemination of illegal newspapers.[4]

Death[edit]

Gravestone with her school photo on it; Eerebegraafplaats Bloemendaal

She was eventually arrested at a military checkpoint in Haarlem on 21 March 1945 while distributing the illegal communist newspaper de Waarheid (literally 'The Truth'), which was a cover story. She was transporting secret documentation for the Resistance. She worked closely with Anna A.C. Wijnhoff.[5] She was brought to a prison in Amsterdam. After much interrogation, torture, and solitary confinement, Schaft was identified by the roots of her red hair by her former colleague Anna Wijnhoff.[5]

Schaft was executed by Dutch Nazi officials on 17 April 1945.[5] Although at the end of the war there was an agreement between the occupier and the Binnenlandse Strijdkrachten ('Dutch resistance') to stop executions, she was shot dead three weeks before the end of the war in the dunes of Overveen, near Bloemendaal. Two men took her there and one shot her at close range, only wounding her. She is said to have told her executioners: Ik schiet beter 'I shoot better!', after which the other man delivered the final shot.[5]

On 27 November 1945, Schaft was reburied in a state funeral at the Dutch Honorary Cemetery Bloemendaal. Members of the Dutch government and royal family attended, including Queen Wilhelmina who called Schaft 'the symbol of the Resistance'.[5]

Legacy[edit]

Postage stamp from East Germany portraying Hannie Schaft

After the war, the remains of 422 members of the resistance were found in the Bloemendaal dunes, 421 men and one woman, Hannie Schaft. She was reburied at the honorary cemetery Erebegraafplaats Bloemendaal in the dunes in Overveen in the presence of Princess Juliana and her husband Prince Bernard. Later, as queen, Juliana unveiled a bronze commemorative statue in the Kenau Park in nearby Haarlem, her birthplace. Schaft was one of 95 people to receive the Dutch Cross of Resistance and General Eisenhower awarded her a decoration, possibly the Medal of Freedom.[6]

Because the Dutch communist party celebrated her as an icon, her popularity decreased, to the point that the commemoration at Hannie's grave was forbidden in 1951.[5] The commemorators (who were estimated to number over 10,000) were stopped by several hundred police and military with the aid of four tanks. A group of seven managed to circumvent the blockade and reached the burial ground, but were arrested when they tolled the bell. From the next year on, the communists decided to prevent another such scene by holding their commemoration in Haarlem instead.

World War I Technologies

A number of schools and streets were named after her. For her, and other resistance-heroines, a foundation has been created; the National Hannie Schaft Foundation (Dutch: Nationale Hannie Schaft Stichting).[7][8] A number of books and movies have been made about her. She features in The Assault (De Aanslag, 1982) by Harry Mulisch, also released as a movie directed by Fons Rademakers. Ineke Verdoner wrote a song about her. Author Theun de Vries wrote a biography of her life, which has inspired the movie The Girl with the Red Hair (Het Meisje met het Rode Haar, 1981) by Ben Verbong featuring Renée Soutendijk as Hannie Schaft. She is remembered each year in November during a national event held in Haarlem.[9]

In the early 1990s, thanks to the Hannie Schaft Memorial Foundation, commemorations were once again permitted. The last Sunday of each November in the Netherlands is a day of remembrance for Schaft's life and work.[10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcdAtwood, Kathryn J. (2011). Women Heroes of World War II. Chicago: Chicago Review Press. p. 103. ISBN9781556529610.
  2. ^ abcdAtwood, Kathryn J. (2011). Women Heroes of World War II. Chicago: Chicago Review Press. p. 104. ISBN9781556529610.
  3. ^Atwood, Kathryn J. (2011). Women Heroes of World War II. Chicago: Chicago Review Press. p. 105. ISBN9781556529610.
  4. ^ abcAtwood, Kathryn J. (2011). Women Heroes of World War II. Chicago: Chicago Review Press. p. 106. ISBN9781556529610.
  5. ^ abcdefAtwood, Kathryn J. (2011). Women Heroes of World War II. Chicago: Chicago Review Press. p. 107. ISBN9781556529610.
  6. ^Erik Müller, Schaft, Jannetje Johanna at onderscheidingen.nl
  7. ^'Nationale Hannie Schaft Stichting' (in Dutch). Retrieved 28 May 2020.
  8. ^'Freddie Oversteegen, Gritty Dutch Resistance Fighter, Dies at 92'.
  9. ^'Herdenkingen'. Eerebegraafplaatsbloemendaal.eu. Retrieved 2014-04-07.
  10. ^Atwood, Kathryn J. (2011). Women Heroes of World War II. Chicago: Chicago Review Press. p. 108. ISBN9781556529610.

External links[edit]

  • National Hannie Schaft Foundation (Dutch)
  • Hannie Schaft at Find a Grave
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